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Weekly Classroom Activities

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Teachers: Want to make your own classroom activities based on Studio Classroom articles? It's easy! Each Studio Classroom magazine contains a variety of topics and writing styles. This means that you have many possible options for teaching. If you're not sure how to create effective, fun classroom activities, we can help. The suggestions on this page will help you get the most out of every different type of lesson. Click on the story topics below to learn more. Good luck!

Profile

Creative application: Have students put themselves “in the shoes” of the person being profiled. What would life be like for them if they were that person?
Higher-level thinking: Have the students find ways in which they are similar or different to the person being profiled.
Web-based research: Have students use the Internet to find relevant information about the person being profiled. Ask them to present a brief summary in English.

Travel

Creative application: Have the students create a “travel brochure” based on the location (or another place) in small groups. Allow the groups to present their brochures to the class.
Web-based research: Have students search the Internet to find relevant information about the location described in the article. Ask them to provide three new pieces of information about the location.
Cultural application: Make students research the cultural traditions of the place in the article. Ask them to compare and contrast with their own culture.

Food

Higher level thinking: Have students share the main differences between their traditional food and the ethnic dishes introduced in the lesson.
Web-based research: Have students use the Internet to find their favorite dish, print out a picture and the recipe, and share with the class.
Listening activity: Teacher finds recipe for the dishes students are familiar with. Without showing students the recipe, teacher reads the materials and ingredients to the class. See if the students can guess what dish it is.

Sports

Advertisement: Have students get into small groups and let each group come up with an ad (e.g. for a billboard, magazine, radio or TV) based on the topic.
Web-based research: Have students use the Internet to find information related to the topic. Have them present three useful Web sites to the class.
Opinion sharing: Allow students to share their opinions on the topic. Are they interested in it? Why or why not?

Teachers' Tales

Pre-reading exercise: Have students share their own special tale of childhood in pairs.
Social application: Have students interview their parents or grandparents for a childhood story. Then share with the class.
Writing: According to the story, write a short paragraph to introduce the teacher. Include the teacher’s basic information, personality, or your observation of the teacher.
Creative application: Have students come up with a different ending for the story.

Entertainment

Advertisement: Have students get into small groups and let each group come up with an ad (e.g. for a billboard, magazine, radio or TV) based on the topic.
Web-based research: Have students use the Internet to find information related to the topic. Have them present three useful Web sites to the class.
Opinion sharing: Allow students to share their opinions on the topic. Are they interested in it? Why or why not?

Culture

Opinion sharing: Allow students to share their opinions on the topic. Had they ever thought about this topic before? What are their viewpoints about it?
Higher-level thinking: Have students identify two different points of view presented in the article. Have them choose one and explain why they support it.
Web-based research: Have students use the Internet to find information related to the topic. Have them tell the class something new they learned.

What Would You Do?

Role-playing: Have students read the dialogues aloud. Practice putting emotion and emphasis into the words.
Creative thinking: Have students write a new fourth decision of their own.
Debates: Have students choose one decision and then debate why they think it is the best.

Society

Higher-level thinking: Ask the students to discuss how the article topic affects society, particularly in their age group.
Debates: Have students debate a controversial or interesting point raised in the article.
Cultural application: Does this issue affect other cultures? Research to find out!

How to...

Show and Tell: Have students bring an item and tell the class what it is and how to use it.
Writing: Have students write usage directions for a specific item assigned by a teacher or a fellow student.
Creative application: Have one student read a step-by-step instructions for making something, then have another student perform following the instructions.

Technology

Pre-reading exercise: Ask students to discuss what they already know about the product or issue described in the article.
Higher-level thinking: Have students discuss how this technology impacts society, especially their age-group.
Creative application: Have students prepare a “sales pitch,” where they have to sell a new technological product or service to their classmates.

Arts

Pre-reading exercise: Have students introduce or perform one of his/her favorite art or hobby.
Web-based activity: Have students use the Internet to find information of their favorite art , hobby, or artists. Share with the class.
Writing: Have students write a letter to their favorite artist(s).

Health

Web-based research: Have students use the Internet to find relevant information related to the topic.
Social application: Have students ask their parents and grandparents about this topic. Have them explain how attitudes toward the issue have changed over the generations.
Role-playing: Put students into pairs, one playing a doctor and one playing a patient. Have the doctor explain the health issue to the patient, and have the patient ask more questions.

Professions

Pre-reading exercise: Have students share their dream jobs in pairs.
Higher-level thinking: Have students share what kinds of professional skills they need in order to reach their dream career.
Social application: Have students interview somebody from their dream jobs or the professions mentioned in the lesson. Share with the class.

Ordinary Heroes

Creative application: Have the students write letters to this person, offering encouragement.
Web-based research: Have students use the Internet to find more information about the person being featured and his/ her organization.
Writing: Ask students to write about a person who has been an “ordinary hero” in their lives. Ask them to share their papers aloud with the class.

Internet

Pre-reading exercise: Have students introduce one of his/her favorite Web sites.
Web-based research: Explore the Internet technology introduced in the lesson. Have students work on a small project based on the lesson topic.
Social application: Have students interview somebody they know who spends a lot of time on the Internet. Collect information about how long they spend time on the Net every day, what they usually do on the Net and what Web sites they use most often. Write a report or share with the class.

Personal Triumph

Pre-reading exercise: Ask students to discuss one small personal triumph in their own life.
Higher-level thinking: Have students discuss what lesson can be learned from this particular story.
Role-playing: Have students pretend to be the main character, acting out the events described in the story. Practice putting emotion and emphasis into the words.

Books

Pre-reading exercise: Have students talk about one of his/her favorite books.
Higher-level thinking: Have students discuss what they can learn from this book.
Writing: Have students write a short paragraph to introduce this book to other people.
Web-based research: Have students use the Internet to find more information about the book and the writer.

Nature

Web-based research: Have students use the Internet to find extra information relating to the article topic.
Public speaking: Have students tell the class about the last great time they had exploring nature.
Writing: Have students write 50 words describing what fact or point in the article was most interesting to them, and why.

Politics

Debate: Teachers pick a debating issue from the article and have students debate over it.
Web-based research: Have students use the Internet to find more information about the political issues, the person or the organizations mentioned in the lesson. Write a report or share in class.
Higher-level thinking: After reading the article, write a paragraph to give your opinions regarding the issues mentioned.
Creative application: Have students create posters regarding the topic.


Want more advice? Would you like to learn how to create more classroom activities practicing conversation, reading comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, writing and more? Come to one of our Studio Classroom workshops! Visit our Workshops Offered page to learn more.

If you have any comments, suggestions, success stories or anything else you'd like to share with the Studio Classroom Educational Resources team, we'd like to hear from you. Please e-mail us at letters@StudioClassroom.com.